# F1: Preparing for Coronavirus Lock-Down

# Preface

# Who is this for?

Individuals and households who do not have symptoms of Coronavirus wanting to reduce their household risk and reduce the spread.

# How does it benefit you?

Preparing for our time in lock-down helps us all slow the transmission and spread of Coronavirus, helps us keep our loved ones safe, and helps our essential services focus on the people who need them most.

# What should you do with this?

You should aim to get to the bottom green box by as short a route as possible...

# Flowchart

Preparing for Lockdown v5

# T1: Coronavirus Symptom Tracker

# Why is the tool helpful to you?

Knowing if anyone has symptoms of coronavirus helps you decide what to do next. The most common symptoms of Coronavirus are recent onset of:

  • new continuous cough and/or
  • high temperature (above 100.0 °F / 37.8 °C)

Note: A new, continuous cough means coughing for longer than an hour, or three or more coughing episodes in 24 hours. If you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual.

SOURCE: GOV.UK; NHS inform

WARNING

If anyone has any of the symptoms below, call your emergency services immediately.

  • severe shortness of breath at rest
  • pain or pressure in the chest
  • cold, clammy or pale and mottled skin
  • have recently become confused
  • are difficult to rouse
  • have blue lips or face
  • have little or no urine output when they pee
  • coughing up blood

T10: Coronavirus symptom severity checker is also available to help you estimate the severity of possible coronavirus symptoms.

COVID-19 Symptoms

# What You Need

Ideal: Sanitized thermometer, printer, paper and a pen or pencil, reputable online symptom checker

No thermometer? Use the back of your hand as described in 'Checking for Symptoms of a Fever' on WikiHow

Unsure how to sanitize your thermometer? Refer to the clear guidelines at HowToAdult

Video: Temperature assessment by oral thermometer

Unable to print? Hand write the table provided below

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need to Do

Monitor household members' symptoms daily. Use the simple paper tracker for mild symptoms provided below, or a reputable online tracker if symptoms are moderate or severe. These trackers provide helpful information wherever you live, however, the recommendations they provide are focused on the country where they are published.

Country Symptom Checker
Australia Health Direct COVID-19 Symptom Checker
Canada COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool
Lebanon COVID-19 Symptom Checker
United Kingdom NHS Symptom Checker
United Kingdom PatientAccess Online Symptom Checker
United Kingdom COVID-19 Symptom Checker (NHS Wales)
United States CDC Symptom Self-Checker

# Example

  • Each row represents a different date.
  • Each column a different person in your household.
  • Track temperature (°F or °C) and cough symptoms (Y / N) every day at the same time.
  • The table below shows an example -- everything is asymptomatic ('normal') until 28 Mar for person B.
  • A template table for your household is provided overleaf.
Date ↓ Name A B C
25 Mar 20 98.3 N 98.6 N 98.5 N
26 Mar 20 98.1 N 98.8 N 98.6 N
27 Mar 20 98.4 N 99.6 N 99.3 N
28 Mar 20 98.4 N 100.4 Y 98.6 N

# Other Causes of Body Temperature Variation

There are other factors that affect body temperature (Web MD).

Raised temperature should only be considered a coronavirus symptom if it exceeds 100.0 °F / 37.8 °C.

# What to do if you think you have symptoms?

The advice varies from country to country, so make sure you know what to do before you need to act. A helpful summary of CDC guidance is here.

# T1: Coronavirus Symptom Tracker (Template)

Using the downloaded pdf, print out and complete one row per day for each person in your household. For additional people, or if you are advised to continue checking for symptoms beyond 14 days, print additional copies. If you do not have a printer produce the table by hand -- it is the information that is important to you, not the format!

  • Each row represents a different date.
  • Each column a different person in your household.
  • Track temperature (°F or °C) and cough symptoms (Y / N) every day at the same time.
  • It is very important you sanitize your thermometer between measurements

# What to do if you think you have symptoms?

The advice varies from country to country, so make sure you know what to do before you need to act. A helpful summary of CDC guidance is here.

# See also these additional tools.

T2: Guidelines for People with Coronavirus Symptoms

T6: Household Quarantine Area

T10: Check Severity of Coronavirus Symptoms

# T2: Guidelines for People with Coronavirus Symptoms

All country guidelines linked in the list below have home isolation policies, and guidance on what to do if the symptoms become acute. Familiarize yourself with them and know what to do if you reach that stage.

Australia Australian Flag Information for those with a suspected case (DoH)
Canada Canadian Flag If you become ill (Public Health Canada)
NZ New Zealand Flag Call Healthline for free on 0800-358-5453 (MoH)
UK United Kingdom Flag Use the 111 coronavirus service (NHS)
USA United States Flag What To Do if You Are Sick (CDC)

If you live in a country with its own guidance, please send a link and we will add it to the list.

# Waiver

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# T3: Essential Supplies

# Rationale for Tool

If we have enough essential supplies in the house for a period of lock-down we reduce the risk to our household and community by having to leave the house to replenish them. We could find no commonly agreed definition for what constitutes 'essential' in the context of the coronavirus epidemic across multiple countries. We reference some sources and have categorized essential supplies under three areas.

# Waiver

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

When in doubt about whether something is essential, ask yourself, "Can our household do without it for the next 14 days?". Deciding to leave your household for a non-essential item increases the risk of spread to your household unnecessarily. This list does not include anything to keep everyone entertained while isolated or in lock-down. Whatever you do for entertainment, remember the principles of social distancing.

# Health & Medication

(adapted from Government of Canada guidelines)

  • Essential medication for everyone in the household
  • Face masks (Best=N95; Good=disposable face masks; Adequate=home made masks; Inadequate=no face mask)
  • Eye protection (Best=Goggles or a face shield; Adequate=Glasses or sunglasses; Inadequate=contact lenses, since they increase the risk of hand-to-eye contact, or no protection)
  • Gloves (Best=disposable gloves; Good=rubber dish washing gloves; Adequate=other gloves)
  • Cleaning Cloths (Best=disposable paper towel, toilet roll or tissue that is disposed in a waste container after a single use; Adequate=reusable cloth suitable for high temperature wash that must be soaked in diluted bleach prior to washing and washed at high temperature between reuses)
  • Waste container (Best=with plastic liner; Good=no liner, but cleaned every day with disinfectant or diluted bleach)
  • Thermometer
  • Plastic sheeting and strong tape (to construct an 'isolation zone' in the event a member of the household develops symptoms, particularly if your household cannot isolate someone in a separate room)

# Cleaning & Hygiene

(adapted from Government of Canada guidelines)

  • Hand soap
  • Alcohol-based sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol
  • Dish soap / washing up soap
  • Regular laundry soap / detergent
  • Regular household cleaning products
  • Store bought disinfectant
  • Bleach and a separate container for dilution
  • Alcohol prep wipes

# Food & Drink

Food: Sufficient non-perishable food for everyone in the household for the duration of lock-down. (Business Insider)

  • Manual can opener

Drink: The large majority of countries have access to clean tap water. Irrespective of this, it is worth filling a few clean containers with clean tap water and storing them in a cool, dry and dark place in case there are intermittent problems with water supply. One gallon (4 liters) per person should be sufficient for short supply outages. More if you anticipate longer outages. Follow your country guidance for sterilizing water if water-born illness is a known risk. (adapted from Red Cross)

# What to do if you think you have symptoms?

The advice varies from country to country, so make sure you know what to do before you need to act. A helpful summary of CDC guidance is here.

# T3i: Essential Supplies – Face Masks

# Why is this Tool Helpful to You?

Face masks reduce the spread of virus due to coughing, breathing and talking. Physical barriers like masks are the most effective tool against COVID-19.

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at the reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

Preferred: Surgical mask or homemade HEPA-filter-based mask

Acceptable: Other homemade mask (bandana / old scarf / old towel / old t-shirt / 2 elastic bands [+ optional coffee filter])

Unacceptable: No mask

# Should I Wear a Mask?

When leaving the house – Yes.

When at home and you are symptomatic or have had recent contact with someone with COVID-19 – Yes.

When at home and you have been in lock-down for greater than 14 days and no one at home has symptoms – No.

There is no harm in wearing a mask covering your face, and it is believed to prevent droplets and a gaseous cloud containing the virus traveling up to 8 meters / 27 feet.

  • COVID-19 is transmitted in droplets or a gaseous cloud exhaled by an individual infected with COVID-19
    • These droplets can travel 2 meters or 6 feet away from the individual
    • A gaseous cloud can travel for up to 8 meters / 27 feet
  • A mask covering the nose and mouth will prevent or dramatically reduce COVID-19 transmission
  • Masks can discourage face-touching, which also protects you against COVID-19
  • Masks are only effective when used in combination with frequent hand washing/sanitizing, social distancing, and avoiding face-touching
  • You must wear a mask when caring for someone suspected of having COVID-19 or if you exhibit symptoms of COVID-19 and must leave the house (e.g. to get tested)
  • You should wear a mask if you may come into contact with people
  • Children under the age of 2, people who have trouble breathing, are unconscious, or are incapacitated should not wear a facemask due to risk of suffocation

Source: CDC, CDC FAQs, WHO, Lancet, BMJ, JAMA

# Types of Commercial Masks

  • Surgical masks are sufficient to prevent COVID-19 transmission
    • The majority of hospital staff use surgical masks when caring for COVID-19 patients
  • N95 and FFP3 masks are not more effective at preventing respiratory illness transmission than surgical masks (Greenhalgh and Chan)
    • N95 and FFP3 masks only provide increased protection when doctors are working directly with the airway (e.g. intubation, bronchoscopy); N95 or FFP3 masks are often only worn by healthcare workers caring for COVID-19 patients during these procedures (Public Health Ontario, UK PPE Guidelines – see Section 8)
    • Members of the public will not be exposed to this increased risk
    • We do not recommend using N95 masks as it provides you with no additional protection and pulls supply away from essential healthcare workers

Source: WHO, CDC

# Home Made Masks

  • Home Made cloth masks can be similarly effective to a surgical mask if worn correctly
    • Ensure your household has at least 2 homemade masks to prevent reuse

# Basic Mask

  • The CDC has 3 different guides for making a homemade mask: sewn cloth, quick cut t-shirt, and bandana face covering—shown below (CDC guide and video from the US Surgeon General)
    • Cotton cloth is preferable to other types of fabric

# Advanced Mask:

  • For someone with more time and materials, here is a video and guide explaining how to construct a safe face mask from a HEPA filter from a vacuum cleaner bag. It is also recommended that these should be donated to local emergency services.

Source: CDC, van der Sande

# Putting On Masks

Adapted from WHO Guidelines

  • Wash your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water for 20 seconds before putting on a mask
  • Cover the mouth and nose with the mask and ensure there are no gaps between your face and the mask

# Removing Masks

Adapted from WHO Guidelines

  • Remove the mask by removing it from behind, pulling the straps over the ears so that the mask falls forward
  • Do not touch the front of the mask as it may be contaminated with COVID-19
  • Surgical Masks: immediately dispose of them in a closed trash bin
  • Cloth Masks: immediately place in a separate bag after use and set aside for washing in your washing machine
  • Wash your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water for 20 seconds

# Reusing Masks

  • Commercial masks (surgical masks) should not be reused and should be disposed of immediately after use
  • Cloth masks can be reused but must be cleaned or sterilized before reuse. There are a number of methods available, listed in order of preference:
  • A washing machine using laundry detergent on the hot water setting (greater than 70°C/160°F)
  • Soak in 1-part bleach in 50 parts hot water (greater than 70°C/160°F) for greater than 5 minutes, then rinse with water
    • This means 2 tablespoons or 20mL of bleach per liter of water, or 1/3 of a cup bleach per gallon of water
  • Masks should be hung to air-dry

Source: CDC, University of Utah

# T3ii: Essential Supplies – Glove usage

# Why is this Tool Helpful to You?

COVID-19 is known to be transmitted via droplets occurring naturally when we breathe and it is thought to be transmitted in gaseous clouds of virus associated with breathing and speaking. Experts also think that transmission can happen if a person touches an infected surface and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth. This tool will help clarify the situations when gloves are a sensible precaution to protect you or others in your household from COVID-19 through contact with the virus with hands.

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

Preferred: non sterile medical gloves

Acceptable: reusable gloves/rubber gloves (e.g. dish-washing / washing-up gloves)

# Should I Wear Gloves?

# When Leaving the House - No

In summary: it is not necessary to wear gloves when out in public. Make sure you wash your hands regularly and do not touch your face.

Medical Gloves – No. There is no strong evidence that recommends that you should wear medical gloves when leaving the house or while traveling on public transport.

Medical gloves are helpful in reducing transmission of pathogens like COVID-19 in healthcare workers, but at the same time they do not provide complete protection.

When leaving the house, it is fundamental to wash your hands regularly and / or use alcohol gel solution at the first available opportunity. Using gloves is unnecessary and can also lead to an increased risk of germ transmission, if not used correctly.

Medical gloves usage does not represent an alternative to hand washing, which is the best way to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Reusable gloves/rubber gloves – No. Wearing rubber gloves while out is not recommended. Unfortunately, you can still contract the virus.

Source: WHO

# At home caring for someone with COVID-19 symptoms - Yes

Medical Gloves or reusable gloves/rubber gloves – Yes

If you are taking care of a member of your household with COVID-19 symptoms, you should wear gloves while touching their surroundings. Remember always to wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before and after removal. If you do not have medical gloves you can use reusable gloves/rubber gloves. They must be cleaned with soap, water and bleach after each use. (20 ml / 1 teaspoon of bleach to 1 L / 2 pints of water).

After using gloves

Medical Gloves: remove them carefully and wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before wearing a new pair.

Reusable gloves/rubber gloves: remove them carefully and clean them with soap, water and bleach (20 ml / 1 teaspoon of bleach to 1 L / 2 pints of water). Allow to dry. Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water.

Source: BCCDC, HSE

# Putting on and removing gloves safely

# Putting on gloves

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for 20 seconds
  • Select gloves of the right size. It is not necessary to double glove your hands.

Source: Adapted from WHO

# Removing gloves

Removing gloves safely

Source: Mount Nittany Health

# T3iii: Essential Supplies – Eye Protection

# Why is this Tool Helpful to You?

Eye protection reduces the spread of virus due to coughing, breathing and talking. Physical barriers like face-shields or goggles can also protect against COVID-19 infection.

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

Preferred: Plastic safety goggles or a face shield

Somewhat Effective: Wrap-around sunglasses, safety glasses

No evidence that they are effective: Prescription glasses, normal sunglasses

Not Effective: No eye protection

# Should I Wear Eye Protection?

When leaving the house – Yes.

When at home and you are symptomatic or have had recent contact with someone with COVID-19 – Yes.

When at home and you have been in lock-down for greater than 14 days and no one at home has symptoms – No.

There is no harm in wearing eye protection, and it is believed to prevent droplets and a gaseous cloud containing the virus traveling up to 8 meters / 27 feet from reaching the eyes, which can cause infection.

  • COVID-19 is transmitted in droplets or a gaseous cloud exhaled by an individual infected with COVID-19
    • These droplets can travel 2 meters or 6 feet away from the individual
    • A gaseous cloud can travel for up to 8 meters / 27 feet

Source: JAMA

  • Eye protection will prevent or reduce COVID-19 transmission through droplets contacting the eyes
    • Eye protection also discourages eye-rubbing, which also protects you against COVID-19
  • Eye protection is only effective when used in combination with other personal protective equipment (PPE), frequent hand washing/sanitizing, social distancing, and avoiding face-touching
  • You are strongly advised to wear eye protection when caring for someone suspected of having COVID-19 or if you exhibit symptoms of COVID-19 and must leave the house (e.g. to get tested)
  • You should wear eye protection if you may come into contact with people
  • Contact lenses are safe to wear, but are not protective and must be disinfected between uses (like prescription glasses) when leaving the house or in contact with someone suspected of having COVID-19

Source: CDC – see Eye Protection, Government of Canada – see Eye Protection, UK Government – see Eye Protection, AAO, Southern College of Optometry

# Types of Eye Protection

  • Face shields or plastic safety goggles are sufficient to prevent COVID-19 transmission
    • The majority of hospital staff use face shields when caring for COVID-19 patients UK Government
    • The videos show how to make a soda bottle face shield and a more complex alternative
  • Plastic safety goggles may also be worn by hospital staff when face shields are limiting or when using microscopes Public Health Ontario
  • Safety goggles or wrap-around sunglasses can provide limited eye protection
  • Prescription glasses or normal sunglasses have large gaps between the lenses and the face, and thus provide inadequate protection
    • There is no evidence that normal glasses provide significant protection against COVID-19

Source: CDC – see Eye Protection, UK Government, Southern College of Optometry

# Putting-On Eye Protection

  • Wash your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water for 20 seconds before putting on eye protection
  • Place your eye protection on your face after putting on your face mask and before putting on your gloves, and adjust to fit
    • Place goggles/face shield over any prescription glasses

Sequence of putting on PPE Source: CDC

# Removing Eye Protection

  • Only remove your eye protection after taking off your gloves and before taking off your mask
  • Remove a face shield or goggles by removing it from behind, pulling the straps over the head and allowing the goggles or shield to fall forward, away from you
    • Do not touch the front of the goggles or face shield as it may be contaminated with COVID-19

Sequence of taking off PPE Source: CDC

# Reusing Eye Protection

  • Eye protection must be cleaned between uses:
    1. Hand wash with hot water (greater than 70°C/160°F) and dish soap for about 1 minute, then rinse and dry before disinfecting with store bought disinfectant cleaning solution or disinfecting wipes
    2. Soak in 1-part bleach to 50 parts of hot water (greater than 70°C/160°F) for greater than 5 minutes, then rinse with water
      • This means 2 tablespoons or 20mL of bleach per liter of water, or 1/3 of a cup bleach per gallon of water
  • Eye protection should be dried with disposable paper towel or air dried
  • Wash hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand rub after cleaning eye protection
  • Any prescription glasses or contact lenses should also be cleaned or disinfected often

Source: Government of Canada – Eye Protection

# T4: Household Lockdown

# How does this help you and your loved ones?

It is very important that household members stay at home. Staying at home will help prevent coronavirus entering your household, control the spread of the virus to friends, the wider community, and particularly the most vulnerable and ultimately 'flatten the curve' and save lives.

In the outbreak of an epidemic early countermeasures are important

In the coming weeks, unless your household has been isolated and symptom free for 14 or more days, behave as if you or someone else in the household has coronavirus. This encourages us all to adapt our behavior so we are better prepared in the event someone does develop symptoms.

# Waiver

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

# Make a Plan for Your Household

Plan for how you can adapt your daily routine, and that of others in your household, to be able to follow this advice. The plan assumes you have a phone or access to a phone. Some of the ways in which you could prepare include:

  • talk to your neighbors and family and exchange phone numbers of household contacts (40 Phone & Email Contact List Templates)
  • make a plan for those in your home who are considered vulnerable, particularly if you household contains both young children and vulnerable persons
  • create an emergency contact list with phone numbers of neighbors, schools, employer, chemist, healthcare provider, pharmacist, the local public health department, and other community resources (40 Phone & Email Contact List Templates)
  • create a list of local and national essential service providers and aid organizations that can deliver essential supplies to your household (40 Phone & Email Contact List Templates)
  • what practical measures that you going to take to maintain social distancing?
  • plan for a ‘separation area’ for any household members who develop or have symptoms (T6-Household Quarantine Area)
  • make sure you know what action is recommended in your area if coronavirus symptoms worsen (T2-Guidelines for People with Coronavirus Symptoms)
  • make a plan for how you will take receipt of packages without coming into close proximity with the delivery person and plan for how you will handle any food delivered to the house (Food Safety Tips)
  • how can you make it easy for your household to routinely wash their hands in designated area(s)?
  • how are you planning to dispose of used tissues that have been used by household members coughing or blowing their nose?
  • Print a copy of the T1-Coronavirus Symptom Tracker
  • Print a copy of the T5-Home Status Notice

Sources: Adapted from CDC, GOV.UK

# Stay at Home for a Minimum of 14 Days

Guidance varies from country-to-country, but this list seems to be almost universal. Items in the list below should not take precedence over your country guidance:

  • Even if you or a household member has coronavirus symptoms, do not go outside unless:
    • you have been defined as an essential service worker in your country and your work cannot be done from home
    • you have no food and you are absolutely unable to have it delivered to your door
    • you have been instructed to by a healthcare professional for health reasons
    • you undertake routine exercise outside for no more than one hour per day and live in an an area with low population density where you will not encounter anyone else
  • Practice Preventative Actions
    • Avoid close contact with people
    • How to Practice Social Distancing
    • Wash your hands when needed for at least 20 seconds)
    • Wash Your Hands
    • Cover your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or shoulder when you cough or sneeze
    • Cover Your Mouth
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth
    • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces
    • Clean Surfaces
  • Watch out for symptoms Symptoms of Coronavirus Disease | COVID-19
    • Measure the temperature of those in your household daily. It is very important that you sanitize the thermometer, with either rubbing alcohol or lukewarm soapy water, before and after it is used for every person in the house, particularly if it is an oral thermometer. (How to Sanitize a Thermometer)
    • Record any significant changes in cough each day for everyone in the household
    • T1-Coronavirus Symptom Tracker is designed to make the recording of symptoms easy
    • T2-Guidelines for People with Coronavirus Symptoms

Source: Adapted from WHO, CDC

# What to do if you think you have symptoms?

The advice varies from country to country, so make sure you know what to do before you need to act. A helpful summary of the recommendations for some English speaking countries has been collated on T2-Guidelines for People with Coronavirus Symptoms.

# T5: Home Status Notice

The simple slides below are designed to be printed and taped to your front door, or displayed prominently for any visitors to your house.

How does this help? Helps households and visitors follow stay-at-home and social distancing guidance during a period of lock-down. Helps keep our essential services community protected.

Updated 6 April 2020. Based on feedback received from a courier, the pdf download tool was updated with fillable form fields for deliveries requiring a signature or not needing one.

Relevance: During a period of lock-down

Instructions:

  1. Edit Slide Templates that best reflect your circumstances for package delivery
  2. Print the slide(s) you need and sign if relevant
  3. Print one of the ‘Symptom Status’, ‘Help Status’ slides (slides 11-14) that best matches your household situation
  4. If your household status changes, change the ‘Symptom Status’, ‘Help Status’ slide

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

Home Notice

Do's and Don'ts

No Symptoms/No Help

Has Symptoms/No Help

No Symptoms/Help Needed

Has Symptoms/Help Needed

# T6: Household Quarantine Area

# Why is this Important?

If you or a loved one has symptoms of coronavirus, with or without a confirmed test for the virus, you will need to create a separate space in the home for yourself or the person(s) you are caring for to prevent the spread of infection among your household.

If you live alone, make sure that your friends and neighbors on your emergency contact list are aware of your symptoms, so they can check in on you. Of course they will still need to follow isolation guidelines to do that.

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

Quarantine space for the person(s) with coronavirus symptoms

  • Best: A separate room per person who needs to be isolated with access to a bathroom not used by anyone else
  • Good: A separate room for people who need to be isolated
  • Adequate: An area screened off from other people in the household
  • Inadequate: No attempt to provide physical barriers at all

T2-Guidelines for People with Coronavirus Symptoms

Caretaker for the person(s) in quarantine

Someone in your household should act as the agreed caretaker for the person(s) in quarantine. Avoid anyone who is considered vulnerable or unable or unwilling to adhere to isolation guidelines. T2-Guidelines for People with Coronavirus Symptoms

Equipment to Manage the Quarantine

  • Sheets and Blankets
  • Towels
  • Clothing
  • Personal care items (eg wash kit, tampons)
  • Tissues
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Portable toilet (if available and the household does not have access to a bathroom with a toilet just for person(s) in quarantine)
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Trash bags

T3-Essential Supplies

Things to Help the Person in the Quarantine Space Cope

Expect the infected individual to spend the majority of their time here. Providing a television, books and magazines, a mobile phone or tablet or other means of entertainment, if possible, may help them to pass the time and stay positive. Many providers of video chat services are providing special deals during the pandemic – quarantine does not mean everyone should not communicate with each other regularly, they just need to do it in a way that minimizes risk of spread.

Free video conferencing

No separate room(s)?

If space is not available to prepare a separate room, separate the infected individual’s space as much as possible from any other communal space in a dwelling, and continue to practice frequent handwashing, disinfection, and isolation with the use of gloves and masks. Continue to follow CDC, WHO or your local health department’s recommended practices to prevent the spread of infection.

T4-Household Lockdown

If you have no separate room, the sites below show you how to build your own quarantine area with some basic tools.

Supplies You Will Need for Setting Up a Quarantine Room

Pandemic Prep: How to Build a Quarantine Room

# Separate clothes and bedding for washing

In addition to keeping personal care items separate, infected individuals should have a separate space to handle their soiled clothing and linens.

  • Bag washing separately: Have the infected individual gather soiled clothing, bed linens, and towels in trash bags or a washable laundry bag to contain contamination
  • Wash with precautions: Caretakers may then handle a closed bag with gloves, and enclose it in another bag before immediately transporting it to the laundry area, where all items should be washed with detergent in the hottest water recommended
  • Cleanse hands: Caretakers should clean gloves and hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based sanitizer afterwards and disinfect any hard surfaces (see below)
  • Wash Your Hands

Source: CDC

# Disinfect

Disinfect any space every time the infected individual uses it. This is especially important if the space is in a shared area. Use a CDC recommended disinfectant, or whatever your government recommends:

  • Bleach solution: 5 tablespoons (approximately 100 ml, 1/3 cup) of bleach per gallon (approximately 4.5 liters) of water, or 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water. Never mix with ammonia or any other cleanser and provide proper ventilation. Do not use anything past its expiration date.
  • Alcohol solution: must be at least 70%.
  • Use the disinfectant to clean all high-touch surfaces in the shared area: counters, door handles/knobs, switches, toilet flush handle, toilet lid, shower/bathtub handles, shower curtain, towel rack, medicine cabinet, sinks and faucets/taps, appliances, remote controls, electronic devices, etc..
  • Apply the disinfectant and allow it to air dry.
  • Do not share towels or wipes used for disinfecting patient areas with other areas of the house. This may spread contamination.

Source: CDC

# Don’t Share Common Items

Avoiding the use of shared spaces and items is important in preventing the spread of infection. In some cases, families and/or roommates may not be able to separate their shared spaces. Whether you can provide a separate space for a sick individual or not, a household with an infected individual should not share items such as:

  • Toothbrushes
  • Utensils
  • Disinfecting wipes
  • Towels
  • Dishes
  • Cups
  • Handkerchiefs or tissues

Source: CDC, CDC, MoH

# Household Pets

Household pets should not be cared for, played with or petted by an infected individual because this increases the risk of transmitting the virus to other people who also pet that animal.

Source: College of Veterinary Medicine, IL, American Association for the Advancement of Science

# T7: Preparing to Leave the House

# Why is this Important?

While many people are under Stay-At-Home orders during the Coronavirus pandemic, there still may be a need to leave the household to go to work as someone in the essential services, purchase groceries, pick up prescription medications, exercise, or walk the dog. If you need to leave your home for any reason, you will need to be prepared with the proper tools to do so, including how to socially distance.

This tool does not apply to

  • individuals leaving the home to work in a health-care setting
  • infected individuals. It assumes infected individuals will follow the advice of their doctor or medical professional regarding quarantine

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

  • Best: Hand sanitizer, a mask, reusable shopping bags, and a plan on how you will re-enter your household safely (+ soap ready for handwashing upon return)
  • Good: A plan on how you will re-enter your household safely (+ soap ready for handwashing upon return)
  • Inadequate: No precautions or handwashing or sanitizing upon return to household

T8: Travel Safety

T9-Returning Home

# Before Leaving

  • Do not go out if you are vulnerable or have symptoms of coronavirus: review T10: Check Severity of Coronavirus Symptoms, and contact your health care provider for what to do if symptoms are concerning or worsen rapidly.
  • Cleanse Hands/Disinfect Items: Thoroughly wash hands with soap and water as well as disinfect anything that may be handled by others that has been in your home. Whether you are living with or caring for an infected person, you may or may not be an asymptomatic carrier. Take care to prevent the unknowing spread of the virus to other individuals.
  • Bring only Necessary Items: Bring only what you need with you, to reduce the items that carry and may potentially come into contact with an infected individual. Prepare your reusable bags for grocery shopping if applicable.
  • Always Have Sanitizer: Sanitizer will be more useful than gloves. Always carry it with you and frequently use it on your hands. If you do not have hand sanitizer, follow handwashing guidelines when you return home
  • Prepare NOT to Touch Your Face: As silly as it sounds, think about this. Once you leave the house, you should not under any circumstances touch your face, as you could transfer virus particles from items you touch and end up infecting yourself and possibly your household.
  • Wear a Mask: People without symptoms but with the virus can still infect others. Wear a mask to prevent possible transmission to others or possible infection yourself.

Source: CDC

The Best Way to Wash Your Hands

# Preparing to Walk Dogs

Dogs or other household pets that need to be walked should be taken outside with the intention of social distancing (maintaining at least 6 feet / 2 metres of distance between yourself and others). Where possible, pets should not interact or play with those from other households at this time, as they may transmit Coronavirus to their owners from other sources.

Source: College of Veterinary Medicine, IL

# T8: Travel Safety

# Why is this important?

Although non-essential travel should be avoided, some individuals must continue to travel during this time. Often, the journey itself is where an infection can be transferred. Many forms of travel that would normally be deemed safe involve contact with many people. If you do need to travel, this guide will help you minimize your risk of contracting or spreading the virus.

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

Refer to T7: Prepare to Leave the Household before you embark on your journey. In addition, consider the following:

  • Best: N95 mask, disposable gloves if available, disinfecting wipes (e.g. Lysol, Clorox) and hand sanitizer
  • Good: Surgical mask, disinfecting wipes (e.g. Lysol, Clorox)

# What You Need To Do

If you are exhibiting symptoms of Covid19 (eg fever, cough), you avoid all travel and follow your country's guidelines for getting tested.

See also T1: Coronavirus Symptom Tracker and T10: Check Severity of Coronavirus Symptoms: Check Severity of Coronavirus Symptoms

Follow the basic principle of minimizing contact with others. If you are able to choose your method of transportation, consult the list below.

  • Best
    • Car (single person)
    • Motorcycle (single person)
    • Cycle (greater than 2m / 6 ft between individuals)
    • Walk (greater than 2m / 6 ft between individuals)
  • Good
    • Passenger in another car that is not a taxi (only two people, one front, one back)
  • Adequate
    • Taxi (only two people, one front, one back)
  • Not Recommended
    • Car or taxi (3 or more people in the vehicle)
    • Motorcycle (2 or more people on the motorcycle)
    • Cycle (less than 2m / 6ft between individuals)
    • Walk (less than 2m / 6ft between individuals)
  • Last Choice
    • Mass Transit and Public Transport
  • Avoid at All Costs Unless Instructed by an Official
    • Air travel
    • Cruise travel

Source: UK Government

# Personal Vehicle (Car or Motorbike)

Refer to T7: Prepare to Leave the Household before you embark on your journey.

  • If travel cannot be avoided, minimize contact with others
    • Ideally, trips should be made alone

Disinfecting

  • Disinfect hands before entering the car
    • If this cannot be done, disinfect all surfaces you touch before and after a journey (steering wheel, gearstick, handbrake, door handles, indicators/windshield wipers, radio, elbow rests, door frame, seat controls)
    • Exterior door handles, door frame and luggage compartment handles should also be disinfected before and after a journey
  • Disinfect all surfaces touched by other passengers
    • Door handles (outside and inside), window controls, seat controls, elbow rest, door frame

Taking Passengers

  • Ensure as few passengers travel in one vehicle at a time
  • Obtain contact details from all passengers
  • If one passenger may have come into contact with an infected individual, they should wear a mask
  • Opening the windows may help reduce the likelihood of infection, especially between taking passengers

Filling Up with Fuel

  • Minimize contact with staff
  • Try and use contactless payment at the pump if possible
  • Disinfect your hands before re-entering your vehicle

Source: Skoda, City of Toronto Guidance, Business Insider

# Taxi

  • Wear a mask and encourage the driver to do the same
  • Minimize contact with surfaces inside and outside the car
    • If surfaces are touched, avoid touching your face until your hands are disinfected
  • Disinfect your hands when entering and leaving the taxi
  • Travel alone or only with members of your household only, if possible

Source: City of Toronto Guidance

# Walking and Biking

  • Keep more than 2m/6ft between yourself and other people
  • Avoid busy routes to minimize contact with others

# Mass Transit and Public Transport

Rail, Bus, Tram, Coach

Entering

  • Avoid crowded trains and buses
    • Whenever possible, leave 2m/6ft between other passengers
    • Travel at off peak times if possible; consider arriving at work early if you need to travel during peak hours and cannot avoid busy transport during this time
  • Take another form of transport (e.g. biking) if you need to take multiple buses/trains to your destination
  • Pay with a contactless form of payment if possible, rather than bus tickets or train tokens

Riding

  • Avoid touching any surfaces or sitting next to coughing individuals
  • Wear a N95 mask, surgical mask, or home made mask if possible, especially on busy buses/trains

Leaving

  • Wash or disinfect hands as soon as possible after leaving; avoid touching your face until you have done so

Source: BBC

# Aircraft

Currently, the State Department is recommending that U.S. citizens avoid all international travel. If a traveler is a member of the essential services, and has special dispensation to fly, follow the guidance you will have been given.

  • All non-essential air travel should be avoided particularly long plane rides.
    • The greatest risk comes from exposure an individual who is carrying the virus, or their infected droplets from sneezing, coughing, talking or breathing in your vicinity (HEPA filters may decrease the chance of infection, if used appropriately and according to manufacturer and OSHA/CDC/NIOSH specifications)
  • Disinfect all surfaces using disinfecting wipes
  • If a nearby passenger is coughing, ask to switch seats
    • If this cannot be done, avoid touching your face and continually disinfect surfaces
  • More time spent in crowded places (i.e. plane, airport) increases one's chance of catching COVID-19

Source: Consumer Reports, World Economic Forum

# Cruise Ships

  • Disease can spread quickly inside the close quarters of a cruise ship, as has occurred in several cases already.
  • The CDC advises against any travel on a cruise ship, particularly for those at higher risk of getting severely ill from COVID-19.

Source: CDC

# T9: Safely Re-Entering Your House

# Why is this Important?

While many people are under Stay-At-Home orders during the Coronavirus pandemic, there is still the need to purchase groceries, pick up prescription medications, fuel your vehicle, exercise, walk the dog, or go to work. This tool addresses how to return home after these activities and take steps to prevent the introduction of Coronavirus into your household.

**This tool does not apply to**

  • individuals returning home from a health-care employment setting
  • infected individuals. This tool assumes that infected individuals will follow the advice of their doctor or medical professional in regards to isolation and quarantine.

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

  • Best: A separate room or garage to place your items, shoes and outdoor clothes. Hand sanitizer, a mask, reusable shopping bags, and handwashing upon return.
  • Good: Leaving items in a designated space before unpacking.
  • Adequate: Handwashing upon return to household.
  • Inadequate: No handwashing or sanitizing. No designated space for shoes, clothing and items brought into the household.

T7: Prepare to Leave the Household T8: Travel Safety

# Before you come inside

  • If possible, avoid hand-contact with door-handles/doorknobs. Use your arm, elbow, or leg to push/pull the door open. Alternatively, use a paper tissue or hand wipe and dispose of it afterwards. If you live in a shared building, such as an apartment block, and there is an elevator or lift in your building, it should be frequently disinfected. Rugs or mats that are placed in communal areas should be cleaned as well.
  • Leave your shoes outside or, if not possible, as close to the door as you can. Once you have your house shoes on, you can clean the floor under the shoes and where the shopping or other bag was placed with a cloth or mop and an soap / detergent. If you touch the shoes, wash your hands afterwards.

Source: NIH, NEJM

  • When you get home, ideally before you enter, take off your outdoor clothes / shoes and leave them in a designated area

Source: North Country Now

# Inside your home

  • Delay unpacking any non-perishable items for a few hours if you can. When you bring objects into your home from outside (e.g. work bags if you are an essential worker, shopping bags, items from the supermarket)
    • Do not put them on any surface such as a chair or table near where you prepare food
    • Do put them down at the entrance outside or, if not possible, inside your household in an area separate from where you normally prepare food.

Source: Femme Actuelle, ANSES

How to Wash Your Hands

  • Take the items from the shopping bag and clean the packaging. Detailed precautions for unpacking shopping bags are described in Groceries and Other Items Brought Inside the House below.

Source: NIH, NEJM, ANSES

  • Discard waste packaging in a designated area.
    • Recycle normally
    • Leave reusable shopping bags in a designated area
  • If possible, remove your other clothes and leave them in a designated area
    • minimize contact with your face as you take off the clothes e.g. when taking off a shirt
  • If possible, have a shower or bath.

Source: North Country Now

  • Disinfect your door handle, house and car keys, as well as other frequently touched surfaces.

Source: NIH, NEJM,CDC

  • Wash your clothes with warm water as recommended by the CDC. Cold water can be used too. (The CDC and WHO recommend warm water. However, some specialists have said that the temperature of the water, providing good soap or detergent is used, is less important).

Source: CDC, ANSES , Newsweek

# Groceries and Other Items Brought Inside the House

  • Packaging may have been contaminated by dirty hands. Even though the virus causing the disease cannot survive in the open air for more than three hours, you can take additional precautions by cleaning the packaging using a clean damp cloth or single-use paper towel. It is not necessary to use bleach.
  • Dispose of any non-essential packaging and wipe those that you cannot remove, such as yoghurt containers, with a damp cloth or single-use paper towel. Hands should be washed thoroughly before and after removing the packaging. Thoroughly wash food items such as fruit and vegetables.
    • General hygiene rules should be followed
  • Fruit and vegetables should be washed thoroughly after purchase and before cooking and eating them. Clean water is sufficient. It is not necessary to use disinfectant or bleach as they can be toxic if not rinsed away properly. Nor is it necessary to use white wine vinegar. After washing with clean water, wipe with a single-use paper towel to remove any remaining viral particles. This is especially important where fruit or vegetables are to be eaten raw.
  • Cooking vegetables at a temperature of 63 degrees centigrade / 145 degrees Farenheit, medium heat, is enough to destroy any virus that might be present. There is no need to overcook food. Fruit or vegetables that are to be eaten raw should be wasted in clean water should be sufficient to reduce transmission of the virus by cross contamination i.e. the risk of the virus being spread through contact with hands.

Source: Femme Actuelle, ANSES , EFSA

# Returning from Walking Dogs or Other Animals

Dogs or other household pets that need to be walked should be taken outside with the intention of social distancing (maintaining at least 6 feet of distance between yourself and others). Pets should not interact or play with those from other households at this time, as they may transmit Coronavirus to their owners from other sources.

If you have been walking your dog, on your return, consider cleaning its paws with water and soap.

Source: College of Veterinary Medicine, IL, CDC, mira

# T15: Working from Home

# Why is the Tool Helpful to You

During the pandemic many of us have been asked to work from home. For some of us, this may already be part of our normal routine; for others this may be something new that we are not accustomed to doing. Working from home or working remotely may be challenging during this period as we may find it difficult to develop a routine and a balanced day. We may also have to consider the presence of other household members. This toolkit aims to provide you with some strategies for effectively working from home.

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at the reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

  • Reliable internet connection
  • Smartphone or telephone
  • Laptop/computer
  • Stationary supplies
  • Ability to use teleconferencing software such as Zoom, GoToMeeting, Slack, Microsoft Teams
  • A suitable area in your home that you can use as a workstation

# What you Need to do

  1. Be aware of any existing guidance from your employer - If your employer or workplace has guidelines for remote working, review them first so that you are aware of your employer's regulations, any technology required and expectations.

  2. Create a workspace - identify a room or area in your house that you can use as a substitute office space. Defining a dedicated area in the home for work, helps to motivate you and mentally prepare you that it is time to work.

  3. Set your working hours - creating a schedule and establishing working hours helps to provide structure to your workday. It may be useful to make the schedule a day in advance or create a schedule for the entire work week. In this way, other household members will be aware of the work week. You can also schedule personal time alongside your work schedule so that you can create a balanced day.

  4. If you also have flexible work hours (where you can work on your own time), then try to schedule your work around the hours where you are likely to be most productive. For example, if you are a morning a person, then prioritize important work tasks for this period. There may also be a risk of over-working while at home. Therefore, it is essential that you identify a time that marks the end of the workday.

  5. Take scheduled breaks - once you have set your working hours and created a schedule, it is also necessary to ensure that you schedule breaks into your workday. If you routinely take breaks (eg. Coffee breaks, lunch) at your regular workplace, then you should incorporate a similar routine at home. Taking breaks can improve your productivity and effectiveness in your job role. If there are other members in the household, you can schedule these breaks at the same time that other members may be on a break themselves or having lunch.

  6. Try to eliminate/reduce distractions - in household lockdown this means that other family members will be at home too. This increases your chances of being distracted and being unable to complete your work. You should ensure that everyone at home is aware of your working hours and let them know not to disturb you during those hours unless it is an emergency. If you are in a room with a door, consider hanging a 'do not disturb' sign on the door.

  7. Dress as if you are actually going to work - while the benefit of working from home is that you do not have to wear formal work clothes, this action may also trick you into thinking you don't have to work. Dressing as you would normally dress for your job helps to mentally prepare you for the work day. It's also necessary if you are having video meetings to still ensure that you appear professional to your colleagues.

  8. Communication - ensure that there is an established mode of communication with your colleagues and that there are set times when to call or send emails. Staying connected by phone, email or video ensures that you are up to date with any new developments at work.

  9. General work practices - if you are working at a laptop or computer for long hours, try to take micro-breaks every 30 minutes to stretch or get something to drink. Use a headset/earphones rather than holding your phone in your hand and against your face. If there are others in the household, remember to mute your microphone when you are not speaking.

  10. If you are struggling to work from home, it is important that you communicate this with your employer so that you can both develop a plan to address the problem.

Source: Safe Work Australia, Harvard Business Review, Wright State University

# Work-From-Home Setup Guide

# T17: Safe Preparation of Food

Last Updated 21-Apr-2020 v2

# Why is the Tool Helpful to You

Knowing any special precautions to take during the COVID-19 pandemic helps keep our household safe.

# Disclaimer

The use of information on this site is at reader's own risk and no party involved in the information production can be held responsible for its use. By using the content found on this website, you further acknowledge that it is not intended to be a substitute for public health agency guidance, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard public health agency or professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

# What You Need

Your household needs little more additional equipment and precautions to safely prepare food at home during the pandemic.

  • Hard surface cleaner / disinfectant and clean cloths or paper towels for disinfecting food preparation areas
  • Face mask (see T3i)
  • Soap and water for frequent hand washing
  • Knowledge of food safety guidelines, particularly with respect to thorough cooking of food, chilling food, cleaning and hand washing and the risks of cross-contamination between cooked and uncooked food

Source: FDA, Food Standards Scotland, USDA

# What you Need to do

There is currently no evidence that food is a source of COVID-19 and it is very unlikely that it can be transmitted through eating food.

Source: European Food Safety Authority

# Apply strict hygiene rules that you normally use to protect your household from food poisoning

The virus is mainly spread through person-to-person via tiny water droplets expelled during coughing, sneezing and breathing out. However, it is possible for COVID-19 to be spread indirectly when someone touches a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touches their mouth or nose, but thorough and frequent hand washing will further reduce any risk of spreading COVID-19 indirectly through contact with potentially contaminated surfaces.

Washing Hands

Sanitizing Food Preparation and Food Service Areas

  • Wash your hands with warm water and soap before you start preparing or cooking food, as well as after having prepared food.
  • Store your food properly (any contact between the food consumed raw and cooked food must be avoided), discard outer packaging before storage (for example cardboard outer-packaging where there is an inner plastic package) while keeping track of key information such as maximum duration limits (e.g. best before dates).
  • Systematically wash fruits and vegetables with clean water, especially if they are not going to be cooked (COVID-19 will not survive cooking).
  • Avoid contamination by kitchenware (knifes, plates, etc.) by carefully washing them with detergent in between using them for different food ingredients.
  • Respect cooking instructions (time, temperature) for food intended to be eaten cooked.
  • Fridge and kitchen surfaces should be cleaned routinely, though with increased frequency.

Source: European Commission (COVID-19 and food safety)

# Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms should avoid handling food

If you do not live alone, it is a sensible precaution to avoid preparing and handling food for others if you have COVID-19 symptoms. Whilst COVID-19 is not known to be transmitted through food, it is always good practice not to handle food whilst coughing and sneezing and to avoid touching your face during the preparation of meals. Tongs and utensils can be used to minimize contact with food and thorough, frequent hand washing is critical in preventing the spread of any bacterial and viral infections.

Source: Food Standards Scotland

# Face masks

If you are cooking for others and believe you have recently come into contact with someone who may have COVID-19, you may consider using a face mask as part of a good hygiene practice.

Source: European Commission (COVID-19 and food safety)